U2 concert at Twickenham: 9th July 2017   Leave a comment

Even before their famous Live Aid performance 32 years ago I have enjoyed listening to Irish rockers U2. As well as appreciating their stirring music I like their crusading style and their attempts to tackle, both musically and practically, issues such as racism, poverty, human rights and the refugee crisis. I know this irritates some people who consider rich rock stars campaigning for the disadvantaged to be hypocritical, but I feel that the airing of these matters with a wider audience can only be of value.

Thirty years on from the release of the iconic ‘The Joshua Tree’ the band are touring to commemorate their most successful album. Originally the only date for the Twickenham Stadium (the home of English Rugby) was 8th July. I spent a morning trying and failing to get tickets but when they announced there would be a second date on the 9th I was able to get four tickets.

Originally we planned to stay with Margaret’s daughter Anita and her husband John in Essex and travel to Twickenham with them and return to Essex that night before travelling on to see other people. Unfortunately for a variety of reasons Margaret was unable to go, so my brother Simon came down from Derby to take her ticket and we met John and Anita there.

We arrived in good time at the stadium. We had good seats allowing a clear view of the stage. The huge video wall, 200 long and 45 ft high dominated the arena and dwarfed the performers.

 

Noel Gallagher and The High Flying Birds opened. I saw them at the Isle of Wight Festival in 2012, then they played new material, the only acknowledgement of the Oasis days was playing ‘Wonderwall’ for the encore.

 

On this occasion they included four or five Oasis numbers, including ‘Champagne Supernova’ and ‘Wonderwall’ and concluded with ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ which in view of recent events, Gallagher dedicated to his hometown of Manchester. This song that had everyone in the auditorium on their feet and singing the lyrics.

 

It wasn’t long until U2 started their set. To Larry Mullen’s rousing drum intro to ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’ The Edge walked down the catwalk, getting a rapturous reception ….

 

…. followed by bassist Adam Clayton and finally by Bono. The band launched into their famous 1983 hit ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’. The band have always been at pains to state that this is not a IRA sympathiser’s song and reject the call to the republican cause with ‘But I won’t heed the battle call, it puts my back up, puts my back up against the wall’. The effect on the audience was electric, everyone was on their feet, waving arms and singing along.

 

The band continues on the small stage with older songs like ‘Under a Blood Red Sky’ before moving to the main stage.

 

Some pictures of the band before the daylight faded: Bono and Adam Clayton ….

 

…. The Edge ….

 

…. and drummer Larry Mullen Jr.

 

One of their most celebrated of songs, the 1984 hit ‘Pride in the Name of Love’, a testimony to the life and death of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, was played whilst an extract from his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech rolled by on the video screen behind them.

 

As the light started to fade the whole video screen was fired up. Simon, who knows about these things, explained that this was possibly the largest and highest resolution screen in the world at a cost of about £1,000,000.

 

The theme of the Joshua Tree album is their experiences of the USA. Opening numbers such as ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’, ‘I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For’ and ‘With Or Without You’ were played against stunning moving images of the American west ….

 

…. or close up images of a Joshua Tree.

 

Of course many images of Joshua Trees, those stark and beautiful icons of the Mojave Desert, appeared on the screen ….

 

…. in a variety of colours!

 

Other images included this huge red moon, but one of my favourite numbers, the celebrated ‘Bullet The Blue Sky’, a tirade against USA military infiltration of El Salvador and Nicaragua in the 80s, was played against images of American citizens of all ages, races, and classes simply putting on and taking off a tin helmet.

 

Bono was at pains to thank the producer of ‘The Joshua Tree’, ex Roxy Music star Brian Eno, without whom he declared there would be no album. Brian Eno is a great unsung hero of modern music and his album ‘Here Comes The Warm Jets’ along with ‘The Joshua Tree’ would be in my top 50 albums of all time. As the show progressed they played the less well know songs from the album, such as ‘Exit’, Bono’s attempt to get inside the mind of a serial killer. The harsh, distorted sound of Edge’s guitar set against black and white, blurred and jumbled imagery was particularly effective.

 

With ‘The Joshua Tree’ played from beginning to end the band took a short break and returned for 45 minutes of encores. They also returned to their campaigning style and to the tune of ‘Beautiful Day’ showed the story of a girl from Syria who dreams of being a lawyer but is instead imprisoned inside a refugee camp in Jordan.

 

In a great piece of showmanship a giant portrait of the girl was unfolded and passed across the heads of the crowd ….

 

…. whilst the band played on under her enormously magnified gaze.

 

The encores continued with such classics as ‘Elevation and ‘Ultraviolet’ but by now it was clear that Bono was losing his voice, and was singing out of tune, the only downside to an otherwise perfect concert.

 

The video screen continued to amaze whether it showed a riot of colour ….

 

…. or separate images merged together of the band playing.

 

Of course there was the inevitable ‘carefully vetted yet randomly selected’ member of the audience invited up to dance ….

 

…. whilst Bono filmed her and video grabs were posted on the screen.

 

Now fully dark the concert venue just glowed with the light of the screen.

 

During the latter songs such as the moving and poignant ‘One’ U2 promoted the rights of women ….

 

…. and the effects of poverty on women’s lives.

 

The age of people holding up lighters during quiet songs is over, ‘One’ was played out to a backdrop of thousands of mobile phones being waved in the air.

 

U2 chose to end the show with an unreleased song ‘The Little Things That Give You Away’. It had been a great show, one of the best, marred only by Bono losing his voice towards the end, the volume being little bit too high for comfort and the acoustics of the stadium preventing me from hearing announcements clearly.

Getting back wasn’t too difficult in spite of a section of the M3 being closed and I was home by 0045.

When I retired I said that seeing Bruce Springsteen, Muse, Bob Dylan and U2 were on my ‘bucket list’. Now I have seen all four. The Dylan concert I think was the worst, as it had no emotional impact. It’s hard to judge which of the remaining three I enjoyed the most, but this U2 concert was, as this extended post shows, the most spectacular.

Posted July 11, 2017 by gryllosblog in Uncategorized

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Birthday birds: species I have seen on my birthday over the past 40 years.   Leave a comment

I have recently returned from a trip to the Lesser Antilles Islands in the Caribbean. As always it will be a while until I have sorted, edited and labelled my many photos but in the interim here is a ‘post with a difference’.

Whilst away I had my birthday and it was a very good day, or at least morning, for birds. This got me thinking, what other notable birds have I seen on my birthday?

I have searched the database and found that I made bird notes on 17 out of the 41 birthdays that have passed since I started birding. Of course many birthdays were spent at work, sometimes on call. It also looks like that on many of the times when I was at home I didn’t bother to go birding on the ‘big day’ as there is often entries for June 8th and/or June 10th but not the one in between.

As I didn’t start digital photography until 2003, many of the photos below were not taken on the date implied or were taken from Internet sources.

Although my first ever binoculars and field guide were supposed to be a birthday present in 1977, I actually got them in May as we had an early June holiday booked, so I was back in Leeds and at work on the 9th. The first birthday when I recorded what I had seen was 1980.

 

By 1980 I had started training to ring birds.  On June 9th I was ringing with my trainer Trevor in the reedbeds at Lodmoor near Weymouth. I will always remember him taking a bird like this one out of a bag and in his inimitable style saying ‘birthday or no f***ing birthday, you’re not ringing this!’ The next time I was to see (as opposed to hear) a Savi’s Warbler in Dorset was on 14/5/11 when another occurred at Lodmoor, in precisely the same spot as the one we trapped in 1980. Photo from the Israeli Ringing Blog.

 

In 1982 my late wife Janet and I had a holiday in Scotland. On June 9th we were on Skye enjoying better weather than when this photo (of the Quiraing) was taken in June 2012.

 

Of the various birds we saw that day, I suppose the highlight was a Golden Eagle, just like this immature that I photographed on Skye in June 2012.

 

On 9/6/84 Janet and I arrived in Torremolinos in southern Spain at the start of a two-week tour of Andalusia and Extremadura. It was well into the evening by the time we had collected the hire car and found a hotel and we had no time for birding. As we sat outside the hotel we saw many swifts flying low overhead. It wasn’t until later in the trip that we realised that the vast majority of them would have been Pallid Swifts, not the familiar Common Swifts. Most British records of Pallid Swift are in the late autumn, I think that any that occur when Common Swifts are abundant would probably get overlooked. This one (pursued by a Goldfinch)was photographed in Christchurch, Dorset on 25/10/13.

 

It takes a view like this to be really sure you have seen a Pallid Swift and we were to get many such views as our Spanish trip progressed. This Pallid Swift was photographed in Sicily by gobirding.eu. Key ID features compared to Common Swift include the scaly underparts, paler head and throat, a paler area in the outer secondaries and inner primaries compared to the rest of the wing and darker underwing coverts compared to the body.

 

Breeding Lapwing have declined greatly in the UK over the last 30 years due to agricultural intensification and draining of wetlands. In 1985 Lapwings were still breeding near to my house and on 9th June I was able to ring one or more chicks. Photo by Garry Prescott https://blashfordlakes.wordpress.com/

 

During the 80s our ringing group was conducting an intensive study into the biology of the European Nightjar, something that continues, albeit at a lower level, to this day. On 9th June 1987 I was ringing Nightjars in Wareham Forest. The lack of white marks on the wing and tail tips identifies this bird as a female.

 

In 1988 Janet and I plus two friends drove all the way from Helsinki in Finland to northernmost Norway. After a week of driving we reached Vardø on 9th June, a town on an island at the head of Varangerfjord in far north-eastern Norway Nearby I saw my first ever Brunnich’s Guillemots, although I didn’t get views as good as this. Photo taken in the Kurils, far-eastern Russia in 2016.

 

We also saw a number of King Eiders. Unlike the last, this photo was taken in Varangerfjord, but not until we returned there in March 2015.

 

In June 1989 Janet and I spent a few days in Jersey, taking the ferry over from Poole. Although a United Kingdom Crown Dependency, birds on the Channel Islands are not added to the British List as they are not part of the British Isles (being so close to the French coast). Only one species breeds there that doesn’t breed in the UK and that’s Short-toed Treecreeper. I can’t find any notes on my trip so I’m not really sure if I saw this species on my birthday or not, but we were certainly in Jersey at that date. Photo taken by Aleix Comeis in Catalonia, Spain.

 

Tree_swallow_at_Stroud_Preserve

My birthday in 1990 was quite notable. Janet & I had returned from an excellent trip to Canada at the end of May only to find the UK was flooded with megas from all points of the compass. Having been away for several weeks it wasn’t easy getting time off work, so I was unable to twitch them and I became stressed out about all these ‘once in a lifetime’ UK ticks slipping through my fingers. On the 8th June I had a social gathering with friends to celebrate my birthday. Mid-evening I heard there was a Tree Swallow on St Mary’s, Scilly. I had to cut my social event short so I could get to Penzance and catch the Scillonian the following morning. I think this was a watershed moment. After those stressful few weeks I concluded that I didn’t HAVE to twitch every rarity if it wasn’t convenient, and although I continue to this day to chase some UK rarities, very few cause a reaction like the 1990 Tree Swallow did. Photo from Wikipedia Commons.

 

No more notable birthday birds until 1996 and then it was just a Raven at Studland. But the following day I set of the most adventurous trip I have ever done – three weeks in the Arctic tundra and forests of north-east Siberia. The trip was the most travel disrupted I have ever been on. It would be fair to say that when it ran to schedule it was the best travel experience ever and when it wasn’t, it was the worst.

 

After having the tour cancelled in 2003 due to the SARS outbreak I finally got to Tibet on a private trip with five friends in June 2005. On the 8th we climbed up the Er La massif (but not to the summit, we did that later in the trip) seeing many excellent high-altitude birds. We probably reached 4700m that day.

 

Accommodation in the area was basic and our hotel (similar, if not worse than this one) had filthy black carpets, an outside loo across a muddy yard inhabited by ferocious dogs and most importantly was 4500m up. I got out of breath just getting dressed. On the morning of my birthday I awoke after a dreadful night’s sleep, absolutely exhausted with a resounding high-altitude headache. It looked like it was going to be the worst birthday ever ….

 

…. that is until a few miles down the rough road we saw a Grey Wolf harrying some Yaks.

 

Mind you I think the Yaks saw the Wolf off pretty quickly. The headache quickly vanished and I received the best birthday present of my life!

 

No more birthday birds until 2008 when Margaret and I were in Cape Town. We didn’t do a lot of birding that day, just a quick visit to Strandfontein water treatment works were we saw birds like Cape Shoveler ….

 

…. and Cape Teal.

 

Later in the day we crossed the Cape Flats, by-passing the notorious squatter camp of Khayelitsha and climbed up to Sir Lowry’s Pass. It was very windy on the pass and we had no luck at all with birds in this area. Later we drove to the town of George where we stayed with Margaret’s cousin and his wife. The day before we had birded the Cape Peninsula seeing Penguins and a host of other good birds and the following day I birded De Hoop NP seeing Blue Cranes and Denham’s Bustards, so I’m afraid the birthday birding, although better than being at home, wasn’t the best of the trip.

 

Fast forwards to June 9th 2012 and I was on Skye again, part of my attempt to see over 300 species in the UK in a calendar year. I covered year this extensively on my blog so please peruse the archives if you are interested. Today Margaret and I left Skye and headed for Harris/Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, more for sightseeing than anything else. Fortunately as it was a Saturday we made sure we had a full tank of fuel and some snacks with us, as nothing at all was open on  Sunday in mega-religious Harris/Lewis.

 

On route we saw a lovely summer plumaged Red-throated Diver ….

 

…. whilst good numbers of Gannets and Manx Shearwaters cruised by. Unfortunately I didn’t get to see European Storm-petrel on either crossing and failed to get this species on my year list.

 

It was quite late in the day when we landed with little time for birding, however we could admire the Hebridean race of Song Thrush, which lacks the buffy wash on the breast and flanks.

 

This brings us to the Uganda trip in 2013, a superb mixture of bird and mammal watching which also was covered on my blog. On the 9th we birded the ‘Royal Mile’ a forested area in the west of the country. Our main target was Nahan’s Partridge, a strange species that seems (along with Stone Partridge) to be basal to the New World Quails! The thought is that New World Quails originated in Africa and spread via Europe, Greenland and North America to their current distribution in Central and South America. If you understand the movement of the continents with time this makes sense. The remainder of the ‘new world quails’ were then wiped out in the Old World by competition with Old World partridges and francolins. Of course I didn’t photograph such a retiring species but I know someone who did! Photo by Pete Morris/Birdquest.

 

OK they’re not birds (but neither was the Tibetan Wolf). Birding and bird photography was rather tricky today but the butterflies were superb.

 

As I have little to show from 9/6/13 I’ll chuck in a photo from earlier on in the trip, – Northern Red Bishop.

 

For much of my retirement years I have purposefully spent early June abroad. It’s not a great time for birding or ringing in the UK and lots of good foreign trips go at this time. In 2014 we were just winding up a great three-week trip to Eastern USA. We had travelled from North Carolina to Canada, birding on land and at sea, sightseeing in Washington and New York and visiting various friends. We ended the tour in coastal Maine.

 

The main targets in Maine (excuse the pun) were Saltmarsh (above) and Nelson’s Sparrows, two closely related species that exist in sympatry here.

 

One of the last species we saw before we drove to the airport was the Willet (really should be called Eastern Willet as the eastern and western races are different enough to deserve specific status). We were talking to an American couple who seemed quite knowledgeable until a Willet flew past, when one exclaimed ‘Mountain Plover’. This just goes to show that you cannot take everything a birder tells you at face value. My birthday celebration that night was sipping a warm beer on a transatlantic flight out of Boston.

 

Back to normality in 2015. We did go to America again that year but in March/April. On 9th June I was in Wareham Forest in Dorset where I saw a Red Kite.

 

I had some serious delays coming home from the Russian Ring of Fire cruise in 2016 so I spent my birthday more or less on my own on the island of Sakhalin. Birding the Gagarin Park near the hotel gave me views of ….

 

…. the beautiful Narcissus Flycatcher ….

 

…. and many Pacific Swifts (an example of which turned up in Scotland yesterday!) Unfortunately time constraints meant that the 2014 Eastern USA and the 2016 Russian Ring of Fire photos never got fully edited and uploaded to the blog. One day perhaps.

 

So we conclude with photos taken three weeks ago on the French island of Guadeloupe. We only had a morning to appreciate the island’s bird life but it was one of the best mornings of the trip. In one small area we saw and photographed the Caribbean endemic Mangrove Cuckoo ….

 

…. Bridled Quail Dove, known only from Guadeloupe and Dominica ….

 

…. Plumbeous Warbler which is also known only from Guadeloupe and Dominica ….

 

…. Forest Thrush which is a bit more widespread and is found on Dominica, Guadeloupe, Montserrat, and Saint Lucia ….

 

…. Purple-throated Carib, which occurs from Antigua south to St Vincent ….

 

…. and best of all, the single island endemic Guadeloupe Woodpecker, which is unusual in being almost entirely glossy black with just a hint of purple on the breast. The afternoon was taken up with returning to the airport and flying on to Martinique – but that’s another story which will be told in due course.

 

So by choosing just one day of the year, albeit one of special importance to me, I can show that on over a third of occasions over the past 40 years I have been involved in something out of the ordinary and have seen (more often than not) some special birds. Perhaps that’s not so surprising when you consider how relatively easy quality birds have become to see and how birding has developed into such an absorbing and rewarding hobby.

Costa Rica part 9: La Selva and Braulio Carrillo National Park; 19/04 – 22/04 2017   Leave a comment

This is the 9th and final post on my trip to Costa Rica. I have uploaded so many photos because the wildlife on this trip was so photogenic and Costa Rica was so rich in wildlife that I felt it needed to be shared with a wider audience.

Costa Rica’s efforts to nurture and conserve the natural environment are to be applauded. I doubt if there are many places on earth where so many interesting species can be seen in such a small area.

Before I start, here are a couple of signs that raised a smile, not necessarily all from the areas covered in this post.

 

One of the best ‘beware of the dog’ signs I have ever seen.

 

Although the sign had been taken down, you can’t help wonder why it was put up in the first place!

 

You’re hardly going to advertise dirty bathrooms are you?

 

Since we left San Jose on April 1st we have been to the south and west to areas near the Panama border, north-west along the coast to Hacienda Solimar, back into the mountains at Monteverde, north along the mountain ridge then descending to the lowlands near Cano Negro and along the Caribbean slope near Volcan Arenal. This final post covers the area around La Selva on the Caribbean slope.

 

La Selva is a reserve belong to the OTS Biological Station where we stayed for the last three nights of the tour. Accommodation was quite acceptable but it was a 1km away from the dining area, which meant it wasn’t easy to pop back to your room for something you forgot. As the area catered for young people performing biological research projects and tourism was a sideline, meals were served up in a school canteen manner and although adequate, didn’t match the service and quality we had experienced elsewhere. Many of the trails were concreted ….

 

…. and even had guide rails. This is great if it encourages those with reduced mobility to get around but it did distract from the wilderness experience somewhat. Oh, and the concreted trails didn’t prevent me from almost stepping on a Fer-de-Lance on the way back from dinner!

 

Now to the birds; on the first afternoon we had a run of good birds near our cabins, the bandit-masked Laughing Falcon ….

 

….. the tiny Bat Falcon,

 

…. and best of all the enormous but exceedingly rare Great Green Macaw.

 

Near to the restaurant we saw beautiful Chestnut-coloured Woodpecker and the delightful all-white Snowy Cotinga but the latter didn’t pose for photos.

 

Birds of prey that breed in North America but winter in South America must pass through Costa Rica as they cannot cope with long sea crossings. Most probably pass along the Caribbean coast and most had probably passed through by the time we arrived, but we were privileged to see a flock of about 100 Mississippi Kites .

 

Collared Peccaries were common and easily seen around the research centre …..

 

…. although potentially dangerous if cornered, these seemed completely accustomed to people walking by.

 

The taxonomy of the larger toucans has been in flux with several former species lumped, but in most areas there are two types, a ‘croaker’ and a ‘growler’. In this area the ‘croaker’ is represented by Keel-billed Toucan ….

 

…. and the ‘growler’ by Yellow-throated (aka Chestnut-mandibled) Toucan.

 

Most male euphonias are blue-black with yellow underparts and crown however Olive-backed Euphonia bucks the trend.

 

I saw two ‘lifer’ tanagers in these forests, Emerald (which I didn’t photograph) and Black-and-Yellow (which I did).

 

White-faced Capuchin Monkeys showed well ….

 

…. as did this Bronze-tailed Plumeleteer.

 

At nearby Braulio Carrillo National Park we had great views of the stunning Snowcap, one of the prettiest hummers of all, but we failed to see the localised Lattice-tailed Trogon.

=

The White-whiskered Puffbird is normally rare and only seen on about 2/3rds of trips. we saw between 15 and 20 over the three weeks.

 

Buff-rumped Warblers were seen regularly along streams.

 

…. and we had more great views of Crested Guans.

 

We also saw the bizarre Basilisk aka ‘Jesus Christ Lizard’ (as it can run across the surface of water for short distances) ….

 

…. and some delightful poison-dart frogs (delightful that is until you touch them as their skin contains neurotoxins).

 

One of the last additions to our list came as we walked to breakfast on the last morning (having just seen my life Slaty-breasted Tinamou) we found a juvenile Tiny Hawk. Some of the non-tinamou watchers joined us further down the track, we walked back to show them the Tiny Hawk, only find that it had gone and been replaced by an adult of the same species.

 

During our time at Braulio Carrillo National Park we were taken to an area of farmland and woodland by a local guide. We were shown a whole range of great birds, like this Thicket Antpitta ….

….. and this Great Potoo. Potoos have evolved an unusual defense strategy, they are able to roost out in the open because they look and act just like a tree stump.

 

Later we were shown a roosting Crested Owl. This large and magnificent owl was roosting in a thicket and getting a good angle to photograph it without disturbing it was tricky.

 

Then we were shown something really bizarre; just what is Rose photographing?

 

…. Honduran White Bats, tent-making bats that shape a Heliconia leaf into a tent by biting the central rib to form an inverted V and then roosting underneath it.

 

So that about wraps it up, we left La Selva after a late breakfast on the 22nd and arrived at San Jose airport in the early afternoon. We all went our separate ways; some flew home that afternoon, some stayed on for further adventures in Costa Rica and I stayed overnight and flew on to Newark the next day to stay with my friend Patty in Connecticut for a few days (see earlier post).

I obviously research foreign tours before I book them, so trips usually come up to my expectations, but seldom exceed them. This was an exception, I found this tour, with its carefully honed itinerary, that squeezed as many goodies into 22 days as you could possibly imagine, to be most satisfying. There were disappointments of course, but not very many. Even though I had been to Costa Rica before, twice to Colombia and Venezuela and three times to Mexico I still picked up 87 new birds considerably more than I expected.

I can highly recommend Birdquest’s Ultimate Costa Rica tour.

 

Costa Rica part 8: Arenal Observatory Lodge and La Selva; 18/4 – 19/4 2017.   2 comments

This is the penultimate post from my trip to Costa Rica covering the the Caribbean slope at Volcan Arenal area and a couple of stops on route to La Selva.

 

 

 

The Arenal Observatory Lodge acts as both a tourist lodge and a scientific station keeping a watch on this active volcano. This was one of the prettiest places we stayed with great views from the deck of the volcano ….

 

…. with a plume of steam rising from the summit ….

 

…. and  the nearby lake. This is the same volcano that we saw from San Gerado (see post Costa Rica part 6) which isn’t far away at all, its just that we came the long way round.

 

There were some feeders close to the decking where a number of birds that I have already illustrated, like Red-legged Honeycreeper, were seen. We also regularly saw Bananaquits, this is a species that gets a surprisingly poor press. It is quite pretty and is the only member of the Coerebidae, so of great interest to ‘family collectors’ but because it is common it gets dismissed as a ‘trash bird’.

 

Small birds like Bananaquit are to be expected at feeders but imagining opening your curtains at home and seeing a Great Currasow on your bird table.

 

…. or seeing a whole bunch of Coatis playing around below it for that matter.

 

One of the amazing thing about the lodges in Costa Rica was how tame the cracids had become. Guans, Currasows and Chachalacas have been hunted for millennia and hence are very timid, but here these Crested Guans were just walking around on the lawn ….

 

…. or perched up on a wall.

 

Seeing the turkey-sized female Great Currasow wandering around on the road was a treat ..

…. upstaged perhaps by by the black male with it’s punk crest.

 

Early in the morning we took a trail to a scenic waterfall seeing a nice range of birds but the real excitement happened on the way back.

 

Totally unexpected was this encounter with a Bare-necked Umbrellabird. In my post about Monteverde and San Gerado I explained how we were disappointed that the nearby ‘brollybird’ lek had been abandoned and they hadn’t been seen reliably at the site since 2014. Having given up hope of seeing this mega we were amazed when one flew over the ornamental gardens of the lodge. Initial views were poor but a local guide leading a couple of guests around relocated it and we all got superb views.

 

It wasn’t a full adult but a juvenile male with the start of the ‘umbrella’ (the forward pointing crest that hangs over the bill) and the bare red throat that is inflated in display.

 

It goes without saying that this was the bird of the trip, not just for me but for just about everyone else as well. I was asked earlier ‘if the Zeldonia was number two bird of the trip what ever was number one’, well here it is!

 

As well as birding around the lodge we also visited the area around the lake.

 

The river near the lodge was crossed by a number of suspension bridges, of far better quality than the ones at Heliconia (see last post).

 

Other interesting birds seen in the area included the retiring White-tipped Dove,

 

…. Keel-billed Motmot, which were often paired with a Broad-billed Motmot (bringing their true specific status into doubt)

 

…. and Rufous-winged Woodpecker (hiding it’s rufous wings under the mantle).

 

On the first night at the lodge I had excellent views of Black-and-white Owl, the second night some of us went ‘herping’. First to be seen was this small venomous viper ….

 

…. and at a pond we found this beautiful yellow frog ….

 

…. but the highlight was this pretty Red-eyed Tree Frog.

 

The day we departed Arenal Observatory we headed for private reserve at La Fortuna in the hope of seeing Uniform Crake, this time we did  and very well, we even saw a pair building a nest. As the light level was so low when we set out I didn’t take my camera, which was a mistake as the views were prolonged and as the light improved they were highly photographable. Back at the reception we did see a pair of White-throated Crakes though (above).

 

As on our previous visit Grey-headed Chachalacas were common and tame ….

 

…. and even their small chicks came to the bird table.

 

Other visitors included the ubiquitous Blue-grey Tanager ….

 

…. and Tropical Mockingbird. On my 1981 trip the guide and two of the clients saw this species near San Isidro and it was the first record for the country, since then it has colonised much of lowland Costa Rica.

 

We headed back into the mountains to Cataracta de Torro, a small lodge that has a number of trails, hummingbird feeders and spectacular views.

 

We were just after two species, both of which we saw well; Black-bellied Hummingbird ….

 

…. and White-bellied Mountain-gem.

 

We continued on the mountain roads to Cinchoma were we stopped for lunch. From the cafe we had views of several bird feeders with the backdrop of another waterfall.

 

However within minutes of our arrival the heavens opened and we were caught in a torrential downpour.

 

At least we were undercover!

 

The hummers sheltered under leaves during the worst of the rain but it only had to ease off slightly and they were back. This is a Green Thorntail.

 

I have posted pictures of Green-crowned Brilliant previously, but none catching the light quite like this.

 

…. our old friend Violet Sabrewing put on a good show too.

 

From here we continued to La Selva and the OTS Biological station where we were to stay for the final three nights of the tour. This will be the subject of the final post in this extended series, but here’s a photo from La Fortuna to end on.

 

But of all the wonderful things we saw today, the Red-eyed Tree Frog early this morning was one of the best. In daylight with the pupils contracted and the iris at full size, the red-eyes look totally  amazing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costa Rica part 7: northernmost Costa Rica; 15/4 – 17/4 2017   Leave a comment

This post covers two areas in northernmost Costa Rica, the areas around Celeste Mountain Lodge and Heliconia Lodge,a boat trip on the Rio Frio near Cano Negro and birding in nearby marshes..

 

From Monteverde we made our way to the beautiful Celeste Mountain Lodge.

 

This lodge, with it’s open plan architecture was a delightful place to stay with great views of the surrounding forest and excellent food. The birder on the left is looking out of a slidable picture window that looks straight onto an elevated bird feeding platform.

 

Hoised up by pulleys, the platform is host to Passerini’s, Palm and Golden-hooded Tanagers, Black-cowled Oriole and Clay-coloured Thrush.

 

Visitors included common birds like Great Kiskadee ….

 

….. and male and female Passerini’s Tanagers. The male looks almost identical to Cherrie’s Tanager of the south-west that I uploaded previously but the female has a greyer head and a reddish blush to the upper breast and rump.

 

Joining them here are the subtle Palm Tanager and gaudy Golden-headed Tanager.

 

This was the only place we saw Crimson-collared Tanager, a life bird for me.

 

Another of the look-alight euphonias. The fact that the yellow comes to a point below the bill rather than there being a wholy dark-blue chin shows that this is a Yellow-throated Euphonia rather than one of its congeners.

 

Black-cowled Orioles appeared at the feeder and in the nearby trees.

 

We stayed overnight at Celeste Mountain Lodge and before we left the next day ….

 

…. we were rewarded with excellent views of the elusive White-tipped Sicklebill which seldom sticks around for photos. A specialist of heliconia flowers (hence the unusual bill shape) the species ranges from Costa Rica to northern Peru but is difficult everywhere and I have only seen it once before (on my 1981 Costa Rica trip).

 

These were not the only feeders in the area; at the entrance to the nearby national park Passerini’s and Palm Tanagers were joined by a Red-legged Honeycreeper.

 

Honeycreepers are part of the main tanager family Thraupidae. Here is daddy ….

 

and this is his ‘son’ (females don’t have the dark remiges and coverts).

 

We spent much of the following morning at an area of rainforest behind nearby Heliconia Lodge. This deep gully was crossed by several suspension bridges.

 

Mel crosses the bridge in the morning mist, but worryingly another bridge had collapsed forcing us to cross the gully the hard way.

 

Birding here was difficult and although we scored with a few nice birds progress was slow. Perhaps the highlight was our best view of Hoffman’s Two-toed Sloth. I know what you’re thinking ‘its got three toes’ All sloths have three toes on the hind limbs, its the number on the forelimbs that separates the three-toed and two-toed species. From here we had distant views over a large body of water with land beyond it. Initially I thought it must be the Gulf of Nicoya that we had seen on route to Hacienda Solimar, but that was far to the south. Others said it was the Caribbean coast but that was too far away as well. It was in fact the enormous Largo Cocibolca in Nicaragua. Unfortunately due to mist and heat haze I didn’t bother with any photos.

 

In the late afternoon we checked out a site for Lovely Cotinga, which looks quite like the Turquoise Cotinga that I illustrated in post #2. Some of us spread out looking for the bird, but it was those who hung around by the bus who scored. I was some way way down hill and arrived breathless only to see it fly. This was the most disappointing experience of the whole trip.

 

A gathering of Swallow-tailed Kites, nice as they were, were little compensation.

 

We arrived at out next destination, the hotel at Cano Negro well after dark and were welcomed by an imitation Mesoamerican statue converted into a water feature.

 

Early the next day we took a boat trip on the nearby Rio Frio some 10 km away from the Nicaraguan border (although the area was anything but frio once the sun got up). There were two main targets, Grey-headed Dove which we saw in the half-light before boarding ….

 

…. and the diminutive Nicaraguan Grackle which just crosses the border into northernmost Costa Rica. The male is far smaller than Great-tailed and lacks the purple gloss ….

 

…. whilst the female, as well as being smaller than female Great-tailed, has a paler belly and more prominent supercilium.

 

Waterbirds that I haven’t featured before on the blog included  Anhinga ….

 

…. Neotropical Cormorant,

 

…. and Pale-vented Pigeon (for such a colourful pigeon couldn’t they find a better name than ‘pale-vented’?)

 

But some birds I couldn’t resist posting for a second time, such as this male Ringed Kingfisher ….

 

…. or the wonderfully bizarre Boat-billed Heron.

 

One of the highlights was getting great views of both sexes of Sungrebe, the Neotropical representative of the Heliorthinidae. a very ancient family that are not related to cormorants or other similar waterbirds. The female (above) is more brightly coloured than the male, although unlike the plumage and role reversed phalaropes and buttonquails where the male incubates and cares for the young, both sexes share parental duties.

 

That said the duller male has something unique in birds, a flap of skin under each wing. If danger presents the two chicks can clamber into the flaps and the male can fly with them on board to safety. Sungrebes and the two Old World finfoots do not generally dive for food, rather pick insects off overhanging vegetation.

 

Surprisingly a boat trip can provide a good vantage from which to to tape out elusive birds such as this Spot-breasted Wren.

 

This bird took me completely by surprise. I have seen Grey-necked Wood Rail on several trips but had forgotten that the populations from southern Mexico to extreme northern Costa Rica had been split as Rufous-naped Wood Rail (not to be confused with Rufous-necked Wood Rail that we dipped earlier in the trip).

 

The river bank was full of Spectacled Caimans ….

 

Some were a bit apprehensive when we got out of the boat at this marsh where the caimans were abundant. However it was good to remember the old adage ‘if it runs away from you its a caiman, if it devourers you it’s a crocodile’. These ran away.

 

If searching for birds is called birding and searching for owls is known as owling then this must be craking. We formed a line and stomped through the marsh hoping to flush a crake or two.

 

We flushed a single Grey-breasted Crake and two or three Yellow-breasted Crakes. By leaving the camera on a wide-angle setting and pressing the shutter the moment a crake flew (without even moving the camera up to my eye) I was able to get this shot of a Yellow-breasted Crake.

 

Widespread from Canada to northern Costa Rica, Red-winged Blackbirds were abundant in the marshy areas.

 

They looked particularly attractive when they raise their red and yellow epaulettes in display.

 

On my return to the UK I heard that a female Red-winged Blackbird had been found on North Ronaldsay in Orkney. A first for Britain (if you discount some deliberate releases in the 19th C) it attracted a lot of twitchers. Although I like to add to my British list I’m not in that league. That said if it was a world lifer and I couldn’t easily see it on a planned future foreign trip I’d have be enquiring about charter flights!

 

On the edge of the marsh was a lake with the usual run of stilts, egrets etc but a group of Blue-winged Teal (just visible in the centre) and American Wigeon (which are not) made the visit worthwhile.

 

In the wet grassland were a few Collared Plovers, a resident wader species ….

 

…. and the highly migratory Pectoral Sandpiper. Recent research has shown that when Pecs have completed the arduous journey from Patagonia to the Canadian/Alaskan tundra, the males then fan out, some visiting the entire breeding range from the tundra of the northern Ural Mountains to Canada’s Baffin Island in a single season. Here they display at a series of leks attempting to mate with as many females as possible over their entire 4000km breeding range before flying back to Patagonia to winter. Aren’t birds just marvellous!

 

It was back to the hotel and it’s weird statue for breakfast, then on again to some areas of marshes and irrigated fields.

 

Here we found that aberrant wader, Wattled Jacana in some abundance. The bird at the rear is a juvenile. Interestingly the Lesser Jacana of Africa looks just like a small version of juvenile African Jacana and is a rare example (in birds at least) of neotony, speciation by remaining in juvenile plumage until of breeding age.

 

Green Kingfishers were particularly photogenic in the irrigation ditches surrounding the fields.

 

Thee same ditches gave us wonderful views of White-throated Crake ….

 

…. our third crake of the day (fifth if you include rails and galinules) although as often happens the bird hasn’t been named after its most obvious field characteristic.

 

I have posted a number of photos of adult Bare-throated Tiger-heron before but here is a tiger-striped juvenile ….

 

…. but this heron, Pinnated Bittern was a real surprise. I have been searching for this bird since the 80’s and have drawn a blank across its huge Neotropical range. It was one of five write-ins on the trip, ie species that have never been recorded in Birdquest’s 30 years of running trips to Costa Rica. Three of these are species that have been added due to taxonomic revision (that is recorded before but not when they were considered full species) another was Wilson’s Phalarope, which was just a scarce migrant and the fifth was this bird – which just goes to show how thinly spread they are over their enormous range. Maybe not quite the bird of the trip but one of the contenders certainly.

 

Another Nicaraguan bird that just creeps over the border into Costa Rica is Nicaraguan Seedfinch. After some searching we found this huge-billed gem in a fallow field.

 

Seedfinches don’t usually feature very high on birders want-lists but with a bill like that this qualifies as a ‘mega’.

 

Our final destination on this action packed day was a visit to a private reserve at La Fortuna. Grey-head Chachalacas were common and tame but we failed to score with the elusive Uniform Crake, (although we did hear it and it was probably glimpsed). Shame as a four crake day would have been something special.

 

Ominous clouds were gathering as we left and headed for the nearby Arenal Observatory Lodge.

 

At Arenal Observatory Lodge some of us went out owling after dinner and saw the magnificent Black-and-White Owl. I didn’t take any photos through. The point of telling you this is that this means I saw eight life birds today, unprecedented in my recent birding history – what a day!

 

Costa Rica part 6: Hacienda Solimar, Monteverde and San Gerado. 11/04 – 15/04 2017   Leave a comment

This post covers our time at the Hacienda Solimar in the dry north-west of Costa Rica, the ecotourist resort of Monteverde and the research station at San Gerado.

 

A common bird through much of Costa Rica but especially in the dry north-west was Great-tailed Grackle. The males are much larger than the females and the strange twisted tail feathers looks pretty impressive in flight.

 

Gnatcatchers were more common in these dry area. I find the nomenclature of the two species to be most confusing, this is a female Tropical Gnatcatcher and has pale lores, on the other hand White-lored Gnatcatcher has a dark line on the lores and is identified by the lack of white supercillium in the male or narrow one in the female. We saw a pair of each species together at one point – no wonder I get confused.

 

 

Yellow-naped Amazon was a great find and a life bird for me.

 

In due course we arrived at the lovely Hacienda Solimar where we were to stay for the night.

 

A working cattle ranch, but with areas dedicated to wildlife conservation, we were able to see substantial numbers of waterbirds during our stay.

 

Perhaps the most numerous bird was Black-bellied Whistling Duck ….

 

…. which rose in large numbers when the pair of local Peregrines appeared.

 

But the main prize was the huge Jabriru, the largest stork in the Americas. in the background are White Ibis and an immature Little Blue Heron.

 

Although this was a paradise for birds we were in a bit of a rush as the light had started to fade and we didn’t get out of the vehicle to scope up the wetlands.

 

Fortunately before the sun had set we had good views of a pair of Double-striped Thick-knees, a relative of out Stone Curlews.

 

Sunset over the Hacienda ….

 

…. and moonrise over the mountains.

 

The following morning we saw beautiful butterflies, flushed Spot-breasted Bobwhites ….

 

…. and watched Streak-backed Orioles building their nests.

 

In the dry forest and open pastures we found ….

 

…. Howler Monkeys,

 

…. Black-headed Trogon,

 

…. the huge Lineated Woodpecker and

 

…. another of those tricky Myiarchus flycatchers, this time Nutting’s Flycatcher,

 

…. and the striking Short-tailed Hawk.

 

Banded Wren showed well ….

 

…. and even did a little show jumping for us.

 

Hoffman’s Woodpecker is the common ‘pecker of the arid north-west ….

 

…. and we had more close up views of Lesson’s Motmot.

 

Ferruginous Pygmy-owl is a widespread and relatively common diurnal species and its call is often imitated by leaders in an attempt to drawn other species in.

 

On the other hand the diminutive Pacific Screech-owl is nocturnal but the guy at the guest house knew exactly where one was roosting.

 

The best bird of the morning was this lovely Lesser Ground Cuckoo which I flushed from the grass just yards from the bus as we were about to board. It flew to nearby trees and gave great views.

 

…. but the species of the day and mammal of the trip was this Northern Tamandua, a species of arboreal anteater that Hermann spotted from the moving bus! It slowly climbed down the bough ….

 

…. and then climbed up the main trunk until lost to view in the foliage.

 

After lunch we left the dry lowlands and headed up into the mountains and the ecotourist mecca of Monteverde. When I visited Monteverde in 1981 it was a 25 mile drive on a dirt road to a small Quaker community where there was a research station with basic accommodation and a small hostel. Now it is Costa Rica’s premier ecotourist resort with accommodation that caters for everyone from lethargic backpackers to the well-heeled.

 

As well as catering to birders, the area has several canopy walkways to allow the naturalist and the curious to get close to treetop wildlife, multiple zip-lines for  adrenaline junkies and a nice line in rainbows. East of the continental divide at 1500m  it is pretty wet, but to the west you can see the clouds billowing over and evaporating in the dry Pacific air. It was quite windy, especially in the vicinity of our hotel which was in an exposed location.

 

The area consists of at least three large areas of protected forest. On our first outing we scored birding gold with not just views, but photos as well, of the retiring Chiriqui Quail-dove.

 

Although we saw another Resplendant Quetzal (making it the third location of the trip) ….

 

… the highlight was the amazing Three-wattled Bellbird. To hear it’s incredibly loud song go to http://www.xeno-canto.org/331004

 

Can any other songbird open its mouth as wide as this?

 

A Coati trotting away down the track resulted in this unusual shot.

 

We were only one night at the nice hotel. Leaving most of our gear there the following day we hiked down a wide trail for a couple of hours to a research station at San Gerado on the Caribbean slope where we stayed for two nights. On arrival we had a stunning view of Volcan Arenal further to the east.

 

The accommodation was probably the most basic of the trip, but there were some nice compensations such as complete peace and quiet, a supply of wonderful moths to photograph ….

 

…. and a balcony with great views of Volcan Arenal. Alison is demonstrating how to get into a hammock without ending up on the floor, something I have yet to master.

 

It was a good job we saw Arenal on arrival as this was the view for most of our visit.

 

We had our fair share of mist and rain whilst at San Gerado ….

 

…. but it did clear enough to allow us to bird the nearby pastures and mature montane forest.

 

Our main target was the amazing Bare-necked Umbrellabird which used to lek in a tree some 45 minute walk from the lodge. Unfortunately this lek site has been abandoned since 2014 (although the tour information still says that you have a very good chance of seeing one here). We did see some great birds in the area though. In the pastures around the lodge was a colony of Montezuma’s Oropendolas (above) ….

 

…. and this was the only place on the entire trip where we saw the scarce Blue and Gold Tanager. Another goody was the riverine Sooty-faced Finch which after hours of searching numerous stream-beds was tracked down at a little river close to the lodge just minutes before departure.

 

Raptors included Black-hawk Eagle, the elusive Bicoloured Hawk (above) ….

 

…. and the ubiquitous Turkey Vultures that roosted adjacent to our rooms.

 

After two rather wet nights (and one rather wet day) at San Gerado it was time for the long slog back to Monteverde. I walked, but about half the group paid extra to be ferried on the back of a quadbike.

 

Back in Monteverde we returned to the hotel and visited some great hummingbird feeders nearby. This is a Violet Sabrewing.

 

…. male Green-crowned Brilliant,

 

…. but the chestnut-throated juvenile Green-crowned Brilliants are a trap for the unwary.

 

A male Purple-throated Mountain-gem shows off all it’s best bits.

 

A female Purple-throated Mountain-gem joins a Lesser Violetear at the feeder.

 

Magenta-throated Woodstar was a life bird ….

 

…. as was the diminutive Coppery-headed Emerald.

 

Although we had started to see a number of species of owl, we still were short of Bare-shanked Screech Owl that we had dipped on so spectacularly at Cerro de la Muerta. Pete suggested we go back to the start of the San Gerado track after dark where to everyone’s delight we scored with Mr Bare-shank (but I didn’t get any photos). Later at a restaurant near the hotel we met up with Robert Dean (left), an acquaintance of Pete’s and a Monteverde resident. Robert is the illustrator of the Helm Field Guide to the Birds of Costa Rica. Originally from the UK he once had an interesting career as a rock guitarist and was a member the 80’s band Japan.

 

The following morning we had wonderful views of Black-breasted Wood Quail but I got no decent photos in the gloom of the forest floor. So I’ll conclude this post with another photo of a female Purple-throated Mountain-gem.

 

From Monteverde we drove along the mountain ridge to Celeste Mountain Lodge to the north. This will be the subject of the next post.

Costa Rica part 5: waders/shorebirds at Punta Morales Saltpans; 10/04/2017   Leave a comment

This post covers a couple of hours visit to a single site, the commercial salt pans at Punta Morales in north-western Costa Rica. As waders (or shorebirds as they are known in the Americas) have a universal appeal to birders I have dedicated an entire post to this short visit and have attempted to illustrate every wader seen plus a few of the terns. We visited some salt pans in this area in 1981, possibly the same place. Nearly all the species would have been lifers then, now none of them were, but I enjoyed seeing them just as much as I did the first time.

 

An early afternoon visit to the salt pans was most successful. Unfortunately we only had two scopes between us so initially it was a slow process getting onto all the waders. However as we walked around the pans we found we could get close enough to most birds for decent photos and indeed I think I managed to photograph every wader present.

 

Many birds were on the bunds between the pans, others were wading in the brine. This mediocre photo has been included as its the only photo I took of Grey (or Black-bellied) Plover, seen in the top right.

 

There were large numbers of Black Skimmers present. A not particularly appropriate name as all three species of skimmer show a similar black and white plumage and this is no more black than the other two. These aberrant terns feed by flying low over water with their long lower mandible just below the water’s surface (the so-called ‘unzipping the pond’), if the lower mandible encounters a prey item the upper mandible snaps shut to secure it.

 

With the skimmers was a small number of Royal Terns. Recent genetic work was shown that the African and American forms of Royal Tern have diverged sufficiently to be considered separate species,  but as yet I haven’t heard of any reliable ways of separating them in the field, not has this discovery been taken up by mainstream world checklists.

 

At the back are three black-billed Cabot’s Tern’s named after  American physician and ornithologist Samuel Cabot III. This is a recent split from the Old World Sandwich Tern, although the American checklist committees SACC and NACC have yet to ratify this (but the IOC and BOU has). In the foreground is a ‘Hudsonian’ Whimbrel. This larger, more strongly patterned, dark-rumped version of our Eurasian Whimbrel has been treated as a separate species by the BOU, but not by the IOC or other world checklists. As the BOU will adopt the IOC checklist as the basis of the British List as of 01/01/18 then we will lose this one from the British List (there have been a few records of this American form in the UK including along-stayer in Cornwall).

 

Most of the species of wader present have occurred as vagrants in the UK at some time or other (hence British birders interest in American waders) but one that hasn’t is Wilson’s Plover which has a more southerly distribution than most.

 

Also known as Thick-billed Plover this species breed from SE USA to Belize and the West Indies and winters as far south as Brazil.

 

Another species that has not made it to the UK is Marbled Godwit which has an interior distribution in North America and doesn’t make any of the major ocean crossings that seems a prerequisite for regular trans-Atlantic vagrancy. A single Whimbrel is the middle of the flock facing left.

 

Here Marbled Godwits can be seen with Black-necked Stilts, Stilt Sandpipers and a single Willet.

 

Marbled Godwits in flight, unlike the other three species of godwit they don’t show either white wing-bars or white rumps..

 

Yellowleg species were surprisingly scarce on this trip. perhaps they had already departed for their breeding grounds in North America. This is the Greenshank-sized Greater Yellowlegs. I saw my second UK Greater Yellowlegs in Hampshire in 2015 but Lesser Yellowlegs is much commoner, one stayed at our local patch for seven months from September 16 and eventually departed after I had left for Costa Rica in late March.

 

Closely related to the Old World Black-winged Stilt, the Black-necked Stilt of the Americas was common on the saltpans. There are four ‘black-and-white’ stilts worldwide differing only in the precise pattern of black and white on the head, neck and back and there is a good argument for lumping them all together.

 

Joining the Stilts, Godwits and Whimbrel in this photo is a single Stilt Sandpiper in the foreground and four Willets. This omnatopoeic bird surely consists of two species, Eastern and Western Willet (these are all Western Willets) and a proposal to split the two forms is being considered by the NACC currently, here is a summary taken from the proposal: The Willet (Tringa semipalmata) includes two broadly allopatric subspecies that exhibit morphological, ecological, vocal, and genetic differentiation. The eastern subspecies (T. s. semipalmata) breeds almost exclusively in saltmarshes and brackish coastline habitat along the Atlantic Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and certain localities in the Caribbean In contrast, the western subspecies (T. s. inornata) breeds in brackish and freshwater wetlands in the Great Basin as well as prairies in the north-western United States and southern Canada. The western subspecies winters along rocky habitat on the Pacific coast from the north-western United States south to Chile. While the two species may co-occur during migration and on certain wintering grounds, pair bonding occurs on breeding grounds which are allopatric between the two subspecies. For more see: http://checklist.aou.org/assets/proposals/PDF/2017-A.pdf

 

There were a number of Short-billed Dowitchers on the pans. This is a difficult bird to separate from the similar Long-billed Dowitcher (and no, bill length isn’t much help) especially if they are silent. Long-billeds are regular if scarce in the UK but Short-billeds are mega rarities, the one at Lodmoor, Dorset in 2012 was only the 3rd for the UK.

 

Here is a better portrait of one species that has appeared in the background in previous photos – Stilt Sandpiper, (not to be confused with the unrelated Black-necked Stilt at the back). A regular migrant in the Americas, this is a very rare species in the UK although I have seen three in Dorset or west Hampshire over the years.

 

Here a Ruddy Turnstone, a very common species in the New World and the Old, perches behind the New World Spotted Sandpiper.

 

The New World Semi-palmated Plover is very similar to our Ringed Plover. Small differences in the bill and facial pattern separate the two and of course there are the semi-palmations between the toes for those with very good scopes and perfect viewing conditions. But the best way to locate a vagrant Semi-P Plover is by call.

 

It’s now time to look at the smallest waders, the so-called ‘peeps’. This, a Semi-palmated Sandpiper, was by far the commonest.

 

Semi-P Sandpipers and a Semi-P Plover. with a single Least Sandpiper at the far right.

 

A flock of Semi-palmated Sandpipers beautifully reflected in the brine solution.

 

This flock of ‘Semi-P Sands’ is joined by a single Stilt Sand and a Semi-P Plover. Notice the bird in the far lower left, the long curved bill means that this is almost certainly a Western Sandpiper on route to Alaska or far-eastern Siberia. Relatively easy to separate in juvenile or in breeding plumages, winter plumaged adults can be very tricky. They winter further north than Semi-Ps, a lot of them within the southern USA and they were much rarer than Semi-Ps in Costa Rica.

 

Perhaps the rarest bird at the pans and one that had never been recorded by Birdquest on their many trips to Costa Rica was this Wilson’s Phalarope.

 

There were relative few non-waders/terns at the pans but this Great Egret posed for its portrait. The taxonomy of the species isn’t settled either with the small far-eastern subspecies modesta probably deserving species status, whilst the New World alba differs from the Eurasian form in bare part colouration, breeding plumes and display.

 

As was always the case we didn’t have enough time to really study all the subtle features of these fascinating waders and soon it was time to leave the pans and head for Hacienda Solimar which will be the subject of the next post.

 

…. but we’ll end this post with a portrait of the world’s smallest wader, the appropriately named Least Sandpiper.