Archive for the ‘endemics’ Tag

Birthday birds: species I have seen on my birthday over the past 40 years.   Leave a comment

I have recently returned from a trip to the Lesser Antilles Islands in the Caribbean. As always it will be a while until I have sorted, edited and labelled my many photos but in the interim here is a ‘post with a difference’.

Whilst away I had my birthday and it was a very good day, or at least morning, for birds. This got me thinking, what other notable birds have I seen on my birthday?

I have searched the database and found that I made bird notes on 17 out of the 41 birthdays that have passed since I started birding. Of course many birthdays were spent at work, sometimes on call. It also looks like that on many of the times when I was at home I didn’t bother to go birding on the ‘big day’ as there is often entries for June 8th and/or June 10th but not the one in between.

As I didn’t start digital photography until 2003, many of the photos below were not taken on the date implied or were taken from Internet sources.

Although my first ever binoculars and field guide were supposed to be a birthday present in 1977, I actually got them in May as we had an early June holiday booked, so I was back in Leeds and at work on the 9th. The first birthday when I recorded what I had seen was 1980.

 

By 1980 I had started training to ring birds.  On June 9th I was ringing with my trainer Trevor in the reedbeds at Lodmoor near Weymouth. I will always remember him taking a bird like this one out of a bag and in his inimitable style saying ‘birthday or no f***ing birthday, you’re not ringing this!’ The next time I was to see (as opposed to hear) a Savi’s Warbler in Dorset was on 14/5/11 when another occurred at Lodmoor, in precisely the same spot as the one we trapped in 1980. Photo from the Israeli Ringing Blog.

 

In 1982 my late wife Janet and I had a holiday in Scotland. On June 9th we were on Skye enjoying better weather than when this photo (of the Quiraing) was taken in June 2012.

 

Of the various birds we saw that day, I suppose the highlight was a Golden Eagle, just like this immature that I photographed on Skye in June 2012.

 

On 9/6/84 Janet and I arrived in Torremolinos in southern Spain at the start of a two-week tour of Andalusia and Extremadura. It was well into the evening by the time we had collected the hire car and found a hotel and we had no time for birding. As we sat outside the hotel we saw many swifts flying low overhead. It wasn’t until later in the trip that we realised that the vast majority of them would have been Pallid Swifts, not the familiar Common Swifts. Most British records of Pallid Swift are in the late autumn, I think that any that occur when Common Swifts are abundant would probably get overlooked. This one (pursued by a Goldfinch)was photographed in Christchurch, Dorset on 25/10/13.

 

It takes a view like this to be really sure you have seen a Pallid Swift and we were to get many such views as our Spanish trip progressed. This Pallid Swift was photographed in Sicily by gobirding.eu. Key ID features compared to Common Swift include the scaly underparts, paler head and throat, a paler area in the outer secondaries and inner primaries compared to the rest of the wing and darker underwing coverts compared to the body.

 

Breeding Lapwing have declined greatly in the UK over the last 30 years due to agricultural intensification and draining of wetlands. In 1985 Lapwings were still breeding near to my house and on 9th June I was able to ring one or more chicks. Photo by Garry Prescott https://blashfordlakes.wordpress.com/

 

During the 80s our ringing group was conducting an intensive study into the biology of the European Nightjar, something that continues, albeit at a lower level, to this day. On 9th June 1987 I was ringing Nightjars in Wareham Forest. The lack of white marks on the wing and tail tips identifies this bird as a female.

 

In 1988 Janet and I plus two friends drove all the way from Helsinki in Finland to northernmost Norway. After a week of driving we reached Vardø on 9th June, a town on an island at the head of Varangerfjord in far north-eastern Norway Nearby I saw my first ever Brunnich’s Guillemots, although I didn’t get views as good as this. Photo taken in the Kurils, far-eastern Russia in 2016.

 

We also saw a number of King Eiders. Unlike the last, this photo was taken in Varangerfjord, but not until we returned there in March 2015.

 

In June 1989 Janet and I spent a few days in Jersey, taking the ferry over from Poole. Although a United Kingdom Crown Dependency, birds on the Channel Islands are not added to the British List as they are not part of the British Isles (being so close to the French coast). Only one species breeds there that doesn’t breed in the UK and that’s Short-toed Treecreeper. I can’t find any notes on my trip so I’m not really sure if I saw this species on my birthday or not, but we were certainly in Jersey at that date. Photo taken by Aleix Comeis in Catalonia, Spain.

 

Tree_swallow_at_Stroud_Preserve

My birthday in 1990 was quite notable. Janet & I had returned from an excellent trip to Canada at the end of May only to find the UK was flooded with megas from all points of the compass. Having been away for several weeks it wasn’t easy getting time off work, so I was unable to twitch them and I became stressed out about all these ‘once in a lifetime’ UK ticks slipping through my fingers. On the 8th June I had a social gathering with friends to celebrate my birthday. Mid-evening I heard there was a Tree Swallow on St Mary’s, Scilly. I had to cut my social event short so I could get to Penzance and catch the Scillonian the following morning. I think this was a watershed moment. After those stressful few weeks I concluded that I didn’t HAVE to twitch every rarity if it wasn’t convenient, and although I continue to this day to chase some UK rarities, very few cause a reaction like the 1990 Tree Swallow did. Photo from Wikipedia Commons.

 

No more notable birthday birds until 1996 and then it was just a Raven at Studland. But the following day I set of the most adventurous trip I have ever done – three weeks in the Arctic tundra and forests of north-east Siberia. The trip was the most travel disrupted I have ever been on. It would be fair to say that when it ran to schedule it was the best travel experience ever and when it wasn’t, it was the worst.

 

After having the tour cancelled in 2003 due to the SARS outbreak I finally got to Tibet on a private trip with five friends in June 2005. On the 8th we climbed up the Er La massif (but not to the summit, we did that later in the trip) seeing many excellent high-altitude birds. We probably reached 4700m that day.

 

Accommodation in the area was basic and our hotel (similar, if not worse than this one) had filthy black carpets, an outside loo across a muddy yard inhabited by ferocious dogs and most importantly was 4500m up. I got out of breath just getting dressed. On the morning of my birthday I awoke after a dreadful night’s sleep, absolutely exhausted with a resounding high-altitude headache. It looked like it was going to be the worst birthday ever ….

 

…. that is until a few miles down the rough road we saw a Grey Wolf harrying some Yaks.

 

Mind you I think the Yaks saw the Wolf off pretty quickly. The headache quickly vanished and I received the best birthday present of my life!

 

No more birthday birds until 2008 when Margaret and I were in Cape Town. We didn’t do a lot of birding that day, just a quick visit to Strandfontein water treatment works were we saw birds like Cape Shoveler ….

 

…. and Cape Teal.

 

Later in the day we crossed the Cape Flats, by-passing the notorious squatter camp of Khayelitsha and climbed up to Sir Lowry’s Pass. It was very windy on the pass and we had no luck at all with birds in this area. Later we drove to the town of George where we stayed with Margaret’s cousin and his wife. The day before we had birded the Cape Peninsula seeing Penguins and a host of other good birds and the following day I birded De Hoop NP seeing Blue Cranes and Denham’s Bustards, so I’m afraid the birthday birding, although better than being at home, wasn’t the best of the trip.

 

Fast forwards to June 9th 2012 and I was on Skye again, part of my attempt to see over 300 species in the UK in a calendar year. I covered year this extensively on my blog so please peruse the archives if you are interested. Today Margaret and I left Skye and headed for Harris/Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, more for sightseeing than anything else. Fortunately as it was a Saturday we made sure we had a full tank of fuel and some snacks with us, as nothing at all was open on  Sunday in mega-religious Harris/Lewis.

 

On route we saw a lovely summer plumaged Red-throated Diver ….

 

…. whilst good numbers of Gannets and Manx Shearwaters cruised by. Unfortunately I didn’t get to see European Storm-petrel on either crossing and failed to get this species on my year list.

 

It was quite late in the day when we landed with little time for birding, however we could admire the Hebridean race of Song Thrush, which lacks the buffy wash on the breast and flanks.

 

This brings us to the Uganda trip in 2013, a superb mixture of bird and mammal watching which also was covered on my blog. On the 9th we birded the ‘Royal Mile’ a forested area in the west of the country. Our main target was Nahan’s Partridge, a strange species that seems (along with Stone Partridge) to be basal to the New World Quails! The thought is that New World Quails originated in Africa and spread via Europe, Greenland and North America to their current distribution in Central and South America. If you understand the movement of the continents with time this makes sense. The remainder of the ‘new world quails’ were then wiped out in the Old World by competition with Old World partridges and francolins. Of course I didn’t photograph such a retiring species but I know someone who did! Photo by Pete Morris/Birdquest.

 

OK they’re not birds (but neither was the Tibetan Wolf). Birding and bird photography was rather tricky today but the butterflies were superb.

 

As I have little to show from 9/6/13 I’ll chuck in a photo from earlier on in the trip, – Northern Red Bishop.

 

For much of my retirement years I have purposefully spent early June abroad. It’s not a great time for birding or ringing in the UK and lots of good foreign trips go at this time. In 2014 we were just winding up a great three-week trip to Eastern USA. We had travelled from North Carolina to Canada, birding on land and at sea, sightseeing in Washington and New York and visiting various friends. We ended the tour in coastal Maine.

 

The main targets in Maine (excuse the pun) were Saltmarsh (above) and Nelson’s Sparrows, two closely related species that exist in sympatry here.

 

One of the last species we saw before we drove to the airport was the Willet (really should be called Eastern Willet as the eastern and western races are different enough to deserve specific status). We were talking to an American couple who seemed quite knowledgeable until a Willet flew past, when one exclaimed ‘Mountain Plover’. This just goes to show that you cannot take everything a birder tells you at face value. My birthday celebration that night was sipping a warm beer on a transatlantic flight out of Boston.

 

Back to normality in 2015. We did go to America again that year but in March/April. On 9th June I was in Wareham Forest in Dorset where I saw a Red Kite.

 

I had some serious delays coming home from the Russian Ring of Fire cruise in 2016 so I spent my birthday more or less on my own on the island of Sakhalin. Birding the Gagarin Park near the hotel gave me views of ….

 

…. the beautiful Narcissus Flycatcher ….

 

…. and many Pacific Swifts (an example of which turned up in Scotland yesterday!) Unfortunately time constraints meant that the 2014 Eastern USA and the 2016 Russian Ring of Fire photos never got fully edited and uploaded to the blog. One day perhaps.

 

So we conclude with photos taken three weeks ago on the French island of Guadeloupe. We only had a morning to appreciate the island’s bird life but it was one of the best mornings of the trip. In one small area we saw and photographed the Caribbean endemic Mangrove Cuckoo ….

 

…. Bridled Quail Dove, known only from Guadeloupe and Dominica ….

 

…. Plumbeous Warbler which is also known only from Guadeloupe and Dominica ….

 

…. Forest Thrush which is a bit more widespread and is found on Dominica, Guadeloupe, Montserrat, and Saint Lucia ….

 

…. Purple-throated Carib, which occurs from Antigua south to St Vincent ….

 

…. and best of all, the single island endemic Guadeloupe Woodpecker, which is unusual in being almost entirely glossy black with just a hint of purple on the breast. The afternoon was taken up with returning to the airport and flying on to Martinique – but that’s another story which will be told in due course.

 

So by choosing just one day of the year, albeit one of special importance to me, I can show that on over a third of occasions over the past 40 years I have been involved in something out of the ordinary and have seen (more often than not) some special birds. Perhaps that’s not so surprising when you consider how relatively easy quality birds have become to see and how birding has developed into such an absorbing and rewarding hobby.

The Comoros: 6th – 16th October 2014   2 comments

On the 6th November we left Madagascar and flew to Moroni the capital of the The Union of the Comoros, a group of three islands that along with the French island of Mayotte form the Comoros, the archipelago of volcanic islands that lie between northern Madagascar and the East African Coast.

IMG_0878 GC beach

Much of the the interior of Grande Comore consists of recent lava flows but the beaches are beautiful, or at least would be if the locals didn’t dump rubbish on and around them.

IMG_0876 salt lake

We were told there was a salt lake to the north of Moroni and visited in the hope of finding wintering waders but instead found a sterile crater lake with a connection to the sea.

IMG_0870 Comoros car aprk

There was a large collection of discarded cars along the route,  some even ended up on the top of houses or on the beach.

IMG_1661 Comoros Blue Pigeon

Birding in a few spots in the lowlands was good with the beautiful Comoros Blue Pigeon,

IMG_1386 GC Drongo

and Grande Comore Drongo.

IMG_1440 France's Sparrowhawk

France’s Sparrowhawk is also found in Madagascar but here is represented by an endemic race.

IMG_1418 Comoros Courol

A number of the birds of the Comoros differ markedly from their Madagascar relatives. The Cuckoo-Roller on Grande Comore (but not on the other islands) differs by being smaller with a greyer throat contrasting with a pure white belly in the male and paler below with more rufous underparts in the female and there are vocal differences as well. It is treated as a separate species in the Birds of the Indian Ocean Islands field guide but not by any of the world checklists.

IMG_0866 view of coast

Our main birding excursion on Grande Comore was an ascent of the 2300m high Mt Karthala. We didn’t have to go right to the top, but it certainly felt that way.

IMG_1463 Humblot's Flycatcher

On the way up we found a number of endemic species including this attractive Humblot’s Flycatcher, sufficiently distinct to be placed in its own genus.

IMG_0859 Mt Kathala

We started at 350m asl and turned round at 1910m asl, a higher climb then the ascent of Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the UK. During the seven hours of hard  uphill slog we managed to loose our local rep and have the porters take our camping gear and lunch to various different localities all over the mountain. Eventually things got sorted out but we had to manage without our packed lunch,  at least one porter abandoned us and the one who guided us up above the treeline had to be bribed to do so.

IMG_1499 African Stonechat

The stonechat on Madagascar is now considered a separate species from African Stonechat (which in turn is considered a separate species to those in Europe and Asia) but know one seems to know what the affinities of the birds on Grande Comore are.

IMG_1520 Mt Kathala White-eye

Well this was the bird we slogged uphill for seven hours to see – Mount Karthala White-eye. We must have been crazy, although to be fair I did get eight life birds that day at various points on the mountain. Only found above 1900m on this island, it is a very range restricted bird. Lower down it is replaced by Kirk’s White-eye, a bird that induced the inevitable comments – ‘it’s a White-eye Jim, but not as we know it’ and ‘boldly goes where no White-eye has gone before’ .

IMG_1566 Mt Katharla campsite

Fortunately we didn’t have to descend 1560m that day, we camped at about 1200m asl in this very basic camp site but we managed to see the critically endangered Karthala Scops Owl nearby

IMG_0868 back to civilisation

Just a three and a half  hour descent the next day and we were back to ‘civilization’.

IMG_0892 landing at Moheli

Previous trips to the Comoros have been really mucked around by the airline with flights cancelled at the last minute but we were lucky. Here we are descending to Moheli. There was a strong wind that morning and the flight was very bumpy, we took it in our stride but a number of the locals were really scared and  you could hear prayers being offered  all around the cabin.

IMG_0893 Moheli airport

Moheli airport is not the most attractive in the world ..

IMG_0915 Moheli rubbish

… nor were the environs of our cockroach infested hotel …

IMG_0910 Moheli birding

… but the birding location along the central ridge was really nice and after the trials of Mt Katharla was really enjoyable.

IMG_1542 Comoros Fody

The Comoros Fody is treated as a separate species from the Fody in Madagascar and may itself be more than one species.

IMG_1638 Moheli Thrush

The Comoros Thrush occurs on Grande Comore, Moheli and Anjouan, each island form is very different. The field guide treats them as three separate species, but again, this is not followed by any world checklist.

IMG_1620 Moheli Scops-owl

Pride of place went to the cute Moheli Scops Owl which showed well in broad daylight.

IMG_1650 Comoros Green Pigeon

The following day we drove to the far side of the island and climbed another hill to see Moheli Green Pigeon.

IMG_1580 Seychelles Fruit Bat

We were puzzled to see a number of Seychelles Fruit Bats flying over the sea and apparently picking objects off the surface.

IMG_0898 Moheli airport

Then it was back to Moheli airport again. The last group had to spend six hours here, we fortunately got away after just two.

IMG_0939 small plane

An unusual plane with virtually no aisle at all. It was quite a job to squeeze your way to the front. Dani (who comes from Spain_ was surprised to find the pilot was a Spanish woman and they had quite a chat after we landed in Anjouan.

IMG_1678 Anjouan Brush Warbler

The hotel on Anjouan was much better than the one on Moheli and we scored with two life birds in the grounds, Anjouan Sunbird and this Anjouan Brush Warbler.

IMG_0995 duff minibus

I once was the Health and Safety Officer at work. Imagine writing a risk assessment for this minibus. A frame bolted to the floor, seats made of plywood with movable cushions on top plus a door that wouldn’t shut properly. Well it got us to our destination.

IMG_0959 Anjouan

In the late afternoon we hiked uphill for about 90 minutes to a remnant patch of forest. After dark we tried for the elusive Anjouan Scops Owl, considered to be the hardest of all the Comoros scops owl to see. Two hours of scrambling, often on all fours on steep slippery slopes only resulted in flight views, although we heard the bird calling at close range. The walk back in the dark was tricky especially for one of our party who was still recovering from a broken leg earlier in the year. Dani and one of the drivers stayed behind to help him, we got back at 2345, they arrived two hours later!

IMG_0987 kids & scope

There wasn’t much more to do on Anjouan so the next day was quite restful with just a bit of exploration in the afternoon. If you run out of birds to see you can always entertain the local kids by letting them look though the scope.

IMG_1013 Approaching Mayotte

The day after we flew to Mayotte, a department of France. Even from the air we could see that this was a much richer island than the others in the Comoros. The islands voted for independence from France in the early 90s, all but Mayotte went there own way – I wonder if they rue that decision to this day.

IMG_1018 Mayotte market

The quayside market. There are still some tin shacks on Mayotte but it look like they are used for storage rather than habitation. Good roads, supermarkets, good housing and plenty of tourists were all things lacking on Grande Comore, Moheli and Anjouan.

IMG_1715 Comoros Olive Pigeon

Some birds showed better on Mayotte than elsewhere such as this Comoros Olive Pigeon …

IMG_1710 Mayotte Drongo

… but it also has four of its own endemics, Mayotte Drongo ..

IMG_1746 Mayotte White-eye

… Mayotte Sunbird (which didn’t come close enough for photos) and this Mayotte White-eye …

IMG_1735 Mayotee Scops Owl

… but once again it was the endemic Mayotte Scops Owl that won first prize.

IMG_1745 Seychelle's Fruit Bat

Seychelles Fruit Bats showed very well….

IMG_1917 Brown Lemur

… as did a group of introduced Brown Lemurs around our lodge which turn up everyday for free handouts

IMG_1909 coral

With all the endemic birds under our belt we spent the next day on a boat trip around the lagoon and further out to sea.

IMG_1823 Brown Noddies

It was a normal tourist trip and we didn’t have the boat to ourselves so it took a bit of effort to persuade the boatman to detour so we could watch a feeding flock of Brown Noddies.

IMG_1775 Spinner dolphins

Pantropical Spinner Dolphins showed well underwater but only briefly performed their famous spinning acrobatics.

IMG_1901 Humpback Whale

The highlight of the day was a mother and calf Humpback Whale. The mother spent long periods suspended vertically in the water with her tail held just above the surface. I don’t know if this is just a resting posture or one that allows the calf to suckle but the boatman had only witnessed it a few times in the many years he had been doing these whale watching trips.

IMG_1965 Crab Plover

On our final morning we had a look around the shore for waders and found a small group of Crab Plovers, an enigmatic crab-eating wader that occurs around the shores of the western Indian Ocean. A suitable end to a very varied, sometimes tiring, sometimes trying, yet rewarding four week tour.

19th – 20th September – Kandavu, Fiji.   1 comment

For my final post about the South Pacific trip we go to the small island of Kandavu which lies just southeast of Nadi.

Due to wonderful ways of the airlines getting there wasn’t straight forwards. We left Taveuni in the late afternoon of the 18th and flew not to Nadi as we had hoped, but to Suva where we changed planes before flying on to the capital. Now remember when we flew from Suva to Taveuni we had to go out of our way and fly via Nadi, now we had to go out of our way again. There was no onwards flight to Kandavu that day so we had to overnight in Nadi and then fly to Kandavu late morning of the 19th.

There are few roads on Kandavu and we were transferred from the airport to the resort on a small boat and had to wade ashore.

IMG_3731-Common-Myna

With little to do at Nadi before we flew to Kandavu I spent time photographing those introduced species that plague the Pacific islands like this Common Myna.

P9190550-Kandavu

The lodge on Kandavu was right beside the sea. Our time there was limited to one afternoon and most of a morning and there were five endemic birds to find ….

IMG_3736-Kadavu-Iguana

… and Kandavu’s endemic Iguana

IMG_3739-Kadavu-Honeyeater

The Kandavu Honeyeater (above) was easy to find, the endemic Shining Parrot was seen in flight but the Kandavu Fantail and White-throated Whistler only gave brief views.

IMG_3779-Velvet-Dove

.. but the last good bird of the trip was this lovely Velvet Dove, the last of quartet of beautiful doves on Fiji.

IMG_3809-Green-flash

The ‘green flash’ that can sometimes be seen as the last rays of the sun shine through the upper layers of the sea.

Well that concludes the South Pacific trip. From Kandavu we flew to Nadi in the late morning of the 20th, my flight to Melbourne was in the late afternoon and I had a long and tiring wait there until 0240 on the 21st. Next stop was Kuala Lumpar and then Dubai. I arrived at Heathrow at 1840 on the 21st and was home by 2300. Adding the eleven hours time difference it was a 47 hour journey from resort to home! I think I experienced worse jet lad after that journey then I ever have done before, in spite of having flown back from the Pacific on several occasions. This was not helped by a nasty chest infection that I picked up on route.

It had been an interesting trip, just 121 species seen (same as a one day winter bird race in Dorset!) but 64 of them were life birds and many of those real stunners. It was a shame I couldn’t get to see the Vanuatu montane endemics but that would require a full on expedition and may have been beyond my physical capabilities or get to the two remaining Fijian endemics, Pink-billed Parrotfinch and Long-legged Warbler but this trip didn’t include them.

Posted October 19, 2013 by gryllosblog in Uncategorized

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14th – 21st September – Vitu Levu, Fiji   Leave a comment

This post continues my account of my trip to the  South Pacific in September. The final of the three island groups we visited was Fiji, which lies within the tropics at 180 degree longitude, ie the opposite side of the world to the UK.

We visited three islands, the first being the large island of Vitu Levu.  We flew from Vanuatu to the capital Nadi but only stayed briefly before flying on to Suva on the southwest coast.  Our accommodation was beside two lakes surrounded with forest. We soon scored with most of the endemics, seeing twelve of them the first afternoon and five including the stunning Golden Dove the next morning. Suva seafront gave us the chance to add a few waders and seabirds to the trip list and another forested area on the Namosi road produced excellent views of both Fiji Shrikebill and the rare Black-faced Shrikebill and brief views of a Friendly Ground Dove (the latter is named after the Friendly Islands, not its decidedly unfriendly habits).

IMG_3338-Fiji-Parrrotfinch

One of the first endemics we found was this pretty Fiji Parrotfinch just outside the airport at Suva.

IMG_3391-Pacific-Robin

Another lovely endemic, this Pacific Robin was in the forest close to our hotel.

IMG_3407-Fiji-Goshawk

Two endemics for the price of one,. A Fiji Goshawk dismembers a fledgling Wattled Honeyeater. Unfortunately the honeyeater was still alive, so this was quite a gruesome sight.

IMG_3438-Golden-Dove

Fiji is a paradise for pigeon enthusiasts. The delightful Golden Dove.

IMG_3428-Barking-Pigeon

Not as pretty as the Golden Dove but fascinating nonetheless. Sometimes called Peale’s Imperial Pigeon, but I prefer Barking Imperial Pigeon because that is exactly what it does.

IMG_3467-Reef-Egret

Some shots from Suva seafront. A dark morph Pacific Reef Egret.

IMG_3495-Pacific-GP-&-Tattl

Pacific Golden Plovers and a Grey-tailed Tattler have flown all the way from the Siberian arctic to winter on these islands.

IMG_3489-Lesser-Frigatebird

The white spur in the axillaries identifies this frigatebird as a male Lesser.

IMG_3478-Gtr-Crested-Tern

Greater Crested Tern

Posted October 19, 2013 by gryllosblog in Uncategorized

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11th – 13th September – Vanuatu   Leave a comment

The next island group we visited on my South Pacific trip this September was Vanuatu, an archipelago of 83 islands situated to the north-west of New Caledonia.

We landed at the capital Port Villa and spent a few hours birding before flying on to the island of Espirito Santo. Our time at Port Villa was not wasted as we saw the trips only Tana Fruit Dove.

P9110390-Vanuatu

Port Villa. The Vanuatu archipelago has become a popular destination for Australian based cruise ships.

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On Espirito Santo we stayed at a pleasant hotel on the east coast. We easily saw the five lowland endemics but the remaining montane endemics that can only be seen after days of arduous trekking, remained out of reach.

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P9120400-Vanuatu-hotel-view

The view from our hotel on Espirito Santo

IMG_3321-Fig-tree

A giant fig tree. Fig seeds are deposited in bird droppings high in trees and send out aerial roots which then grow up around the host tree and eventually kill it, leaving the now mature fig standing on its own.

IMG_3318-Fig-tree

Looking upwards from where the host tree once stood.

IMG_3294-Buff-bellied-Monar

An endemic Buff-bellied Monarch

P9130408-drinking-coconuts

After a hot walk in the dense undergrowth, a refreshing drink from freshly cut coconuts was most welcome.

IMG_3314-Nutmeg-Mannikins

Introduced Nutmeg Mannikins were common in some vilages.

IMG_3258-Vanuatu-Collared-K

The endemic santoensis race of the widespread Collared Kingfisher.

IMG_3267-Red-bellied-Fruit-

As well as the endemic Tana Fruit Dove we saw the more widespread Red-bellied Fruit Dove

IMG_3280-Pacific-Imperial-P

Pacific Imperial Pigeon

Posted October 11, 2013 by gryllosblog in Uncategorized

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