Archive for the ‘Macaw’ Tag

Costa Rica part 9: La Selva and Braulio Carrillo National Park; 19/04 – 22/04 2017   Leave a comment

This is the 9th and final post on my trip to Costa Rica. I have uploaded so many photos because the wildlife on this trip was so photogenic and Costa Rica was so rich in wildlife that I felt it needed to be shared with a wider audience.

Costa Rica’s efforts to nurture and conserve the natural environment are to be applauded. I doubt if there are many places on earth where so many interesting species can be seen in such a small area.

Before I start, here are a couple of signs that raised a smile, not necessarily all from the areas covered in this post.

 

One of the best ‘beware of the dog’ signs I have ever seen.

 

Although the sign had been taken down, you can’t help wonder why it was put up in the first place!

 

You’re hardly going to advertise dirty bathrooms are you?

 

Since we left San Jose on April 1st we have been to the south and west to areas near the Panama border, north-west along the coast to Hacienda Solimar, back into the mountains at Monteverde, north along the mountain ridge then descending to the lowlands near Cano Negro and along the Caribbean slope near Volcan Arenal. This final post covers the area around La Selva on the Caribbean slope.

 

La Selva is a reserve belong to the OTS Biological Station where we stayed for the last three nights of the tour. Accommodation was quite acceptable but it was a 1km away from the dining area, which meant it wasn’t easy to pop back to your room for something you forgot. As the area catered for young people performing biological research projects and tourism was a sideline, meals were served up in a school canteen manner and although adequate, didn’t match the service and quality we had experienced elsewhere. Many of the trails were concreted ….

 

…. and even had guide rails. This is great if it encourages those with reduced mobility to get around but it did distract from the wilderness experience somewhat. Oh, and the concreted trails didn’t prevent me from almost stepping on a Fer-de-Lance on the way back from dinner!

 

Now to the birds; on the first afternoon we had a run of good birds near our cabins, the bandit-masked Laughing Falcon ….

 

….. the tiny Bat Falcon,

 

…. and best of all the enormous but exceedingly rare Great Green Macaw.

 

Near to the restaurant we saw beautiful Chestnut-coloured Woodpecker and the delightful all-white Snowy Cotinga but the latter didn’t pose for photos.

 

Birds of prey that breed in North America but winter in South America must pass through Costa Rica as they cannot cope with long sea crossings. Most probably pass along the Caribbean coast and most had probably passed through by the time we arrived, but we were privileged to see a flock of about 100 Mississippi Kites .

 

Collared Peccaries were common and easily seen around the research centre …..

 

…. although potentially dangerous if cornered, these seemed completely accustomed to people walking by.

 

The taxonomy of the larger toucans has been in flux with several former species lumped, but in most areas there are two types, a ‘croaker’ and a ‘growler’. In this area the ‘croaker’ is represented by Keel-billed Toucan ….

 

…. and the ‘growler’ by Yellow-throated (aka Chestnut-mandibled) Toucan.

 

Most male euphonias are blue-black with yellow underparts and crown however Olive-backed Euphonia bucks the trend.

 

I saw two ‘lifer’ tanagers in these forests, Emerald (which I didn’t photograph) and Black-and-Yellow (which I did).

 

White-faced Capuchin Monkeys showed well ….

 

…. as did this Bronze-tailed Plumeleteer.

 

At nearby Braulio Carrillo National Park we had great views of the stunning Snowcap, one of the prettiest hummers of all, but we failed to see the localised Lattice-tailed Trogon.

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The White-whiskered Puffbird is normally rare and only seen on about 2/3rds of trips. we saw between 15 and 20 over the three weeks.

 

Buff-rumped Warblers were seen regularly along streams.

 

…. and we had more great views of Crested Guans.

 

We also saw the bizarre Basilisk aka ‘Jesus Christ Lizard’ (as it can run across the surface of water for short distances) ….

 

…. and some delightful poison-dart frogs (delightful that is until you touch them as their skin contains neurotoxins).

 

One of the last additions to our list came as we walked to breakfast on the last morning (having just seen my life Slaty-breasted Tinamou) we found a juvenile Tiny Hawk. Some of the non-tinamou watchers joined us further down the track, we walked back to show them the Tiny Hawk, only find that it had gone and been replaced by an adult of the same species.

 

During our time at Braulio Carrillo National Park we were taken to an area of farmland and woodland by a local guide. We were shown a whole range of great birds, like this Thicket Antpitta ….

….. and this Great Potoo. Potoos have evolved an unusual defense strategy, they are able to roost out in the open because they look and act just like a tree stump.

 

Later we were shown a roosting Crested Owl. This large and magnificent owl was roosting in a thicket and getting a good angle to photograph it without disturbing it was tricky.

 

Then we were shown something really bizarre; just what is Rose photographing?

 

…. Honduran White Bats, tent-making bats that shape a Heliconia leaf into a tent by biting the central rib to form an inverted V and then roosting underneath it.

 

So that about wraps it up, we left La Selva after a late breakfast on the 22nd and arrived at San Jose airport in the early afternoon. We all went our separate ways; some flew home that afternoon, some stayed on for further adventures in Costa Rica and I stayed overnight and flew on to Newark the next day to stay with my friend Patty in Connecticut for a few days (see earlier post).

I obviously research foreign tours before I book them, so trips usually come up to my expectations, but seldom exceed them. This was an exception, I found this tour, with its carefully honed itinerary, that squeezed as many goodies into 22 days as you could possibly imagine, to be most satisfying. There were disappointments of course, but not very many. Even though I had been to Costa Rica before, twice to Colombia and Venezuela and three times to Mexico I still picked up 87 new birds considerably more than I expected.

I can highly recommend Birdquest’s Ultimate Costa Rica tour.

 

Costa Rica part 4: Rio Grande de Tarcoles and Carara National Park; 8th-10th April 2017   Leave a comment

 

This post covers the boat trip on the Rio Grande de Tarcoles and our time at Carara National Park.

 

After departing the Rio Rincon area (which was covered in the last post) we headed north along the Pacific coast until we reached the Rio Tarcoles. We spent much of the afternoon on the river seeing a great variety of birdlife.

 

Amongst the many species present were White Ibis ….

 

…. here with a Roseate Spoonbill,

 

…. adult Little Blue Heron (immatures are predominately white) unfortunately it lined itself up with some discarded plastic.

 

…. Tricoloured (formerly Louisiana) Heron,

 

…. and the diminutive Green Heron,

 

…. but pick of the bunch was the bizarre Boat-billed Heron. Their huge and weirdly shaped bill has evolved to scoop fish and other prey items from the surface of the water, whilst the enormous eyes are an adaptation to a nocturnal existence.

 

Another speciality of the mangroves is ‘Mangrove’ Black Hawk, once thought to be a separate species, it is now lumped in with Common Black Hawk.

 

There are only six kingfishers in the New World (compared to 108 in the Old World) and the appropriately named American Pygmy Kingfisher is the smallest of the six.

 

As we reached the mouth of the river we saw other tourist boats ….

 

…. their main interest seemed to be the enormous (and rare) American Crocodiles ….

 

…. but we also enjoyed more views of the pretty White Ibis ….

 

…. and a camera-shy Roseate Spoonbill.

 

We had the luxury of staying at a lodge near Carara NP for two nights, it was one of those all-inclusive places, so most of us swapped an evening beer for numerous cocktails, but of course we were out at dawn the following morning. The Park was surprisingly busy with tourists, especially by mid-morning and there was quite a grockle-jam to photograph beauties like this Scarlet Macaw.

 

Some of the biggest of the worlds parrots, the raucous screech of the large macaws carries for miles. Many species are threatened due to the demands of the pet trade and indeed some species have gone extinct, whilst others hover on the brink.

 

The acrobatics of a Central American Spider Monkey entertained the crowds.

 

Only Neotropical monkeys have prehensile tails which they can use as a fifth limb and which can support their entire weight.

 

A Tarantula on the path produced gasps of horror from the grockles but many stopped to photograph it.

 

We saw about a dozen species of woodcreeper on the tour but this one, Northern Barred Woodcreeper was one of the best.

 

Antthrushes are placed in a different family from other ‘ant-thingies’. Skulking around the forest floor with their tails cocked up like a tiny chicken, they are one of the great prizes of Neotropical birding. This is Black-faced Antthrush.

 

And here is one of the many ‘ant-thingies’ we saw on the tour, a Chestnut-backed Antbird.

 

Puffbirds are more closely related to kingfisher and jacamars than to the passerines. They have a habit of sitting still for long periods which means that once found they can be easy to photograph. White-winged Puffbirds were unusually common on this trip with up to 20 seen. Although they have quite a large Neotropical range I have never seen more than three on a trip before.

 

We only saw one species of jacamar, Rufous-tailed, but they were quite common and conspicuous.

 

Tanagers are no longer a monophyletic group, some are now placed with the cardinals, others with buntings, whilst seedeaters, saltators and even some grosbeaks have been moved into the traditional tanager family Thraupidae. This means tanagers turn up in many different places in the field guide and checklist. Fortunately this White-winged Tanager is still in Thraupidae.

 

In the afternoon we sat quietly on a little used trail and kept our eyes on a nearby stream in the hope that birds would come to bathe. We didn’t have to wait long until a couple of male Red-capped Manakins appeared.

 

We had extended views of the males (and a female) bathing ….

 

Male manakins are best known for their elaborate displays where a dominant male is ‘helped’ in a coordinated dance routine by a number of younger subordinate males. We didn’t see this with this species but we did in the related Long-tailed Manakin, but I didn’t get any decent photos.

 

Later an impressive Great Tinamou came down to drink. All tinamous are elusive and timid due to a long history of being hunted by humans and we were privileged to see one so well.

 

It’s not very often you get to photograph the undertail pattern of a tinamou.

 

A couple of Central American Agoutis also came to drink.

 

We also had time to bird around the lodge, both after lunch and before departure on the second day. This huge Iguana was entertaining ….

 

…. and we had great view of Turquoise-browed Motmot ….

 

…. one of six species of motmot we were to see on the trip. By the way motmot’s tail feathers don’t grow like this, the birds strip off the barbs with their bills to give themselves their distinctive look.

 

Of course the ubiquitous Clay-coloured Thrush (Costa Rica’s national bird) was present ….

 

…. and so was this multi-coloured Painted Bunting ….

 

…. but pride of place goes to the pair of Spectacled Owls that lived in the huge tree by the dining area ….

 

…. although there was some uncertainty among some of those present as to who actually feeds the baby!

 

On 21st March the sun will be over head at midday at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude of Cuba or northern Mexico. On 21st June it will be overhead over the northern Amazon, however at midday in mid April its overhead in northern Costa Rica and it certainly felt like it was!

 

On route to some salt pans we stopped by the mangroves to look for Rufous-necked Wood-rail, a species that I have missed on a number of tours. It was in the heat of the day and not surprisingly we dipped.

 

 

 

We were on our way to some salt pans to look at waders (or shorebirds as they say in the New World). I took so many photos of the waders that I thought they deserved a post of their own so this will be following shortly as part five of my Costa Rican narrative.